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Federation Continues to Spearhead CWD Containment Efforts

Photo by Charlie Curry

By following game laws and supporting Tennessee Wildlife Federation, you are the key to keeping Tennessee CWD free. Despite chronic wasting disease recently being found in Mississippi, Tennessee Wildlife Federation has made significant progress on keeping the disease out of Tennessee. Since the Federation hosted the Chronic Wasting Disease Summit in February 2017, we have successfully advocated for a carcass importation ban in Tennessee. The ban was adopted last summer and then strengthened in February of this year.

In the fall of 2017, the Federation hosted Dr. John Fischer, director of University of Georgia’s Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, on a tele-townhall with state leaders. That discussion is available here, along with updated resources about the disease. Visit tnwf.org/CWD to learn more.

Because of your support, the Federation is a nationally recognized leader in conservation and is able to continue spearheading efforts to safeguard our wildlife in a variety of ways, including efforts to keep Tennessee CWD free.

12 replies
  1. Michael
    Michael says:

    Wow. As a lifetime license holder, there are few fees or tickets to purchase aside from a duck or trout stamp. That’s value if you ask me. There are certainly state lands available to hunt on in West Tennessee. One can always look for a lease on private and if that’s not enough. TWRA has done a lot to make opportunities available for hunters, youth & women in the last decade. TWF goes all out for youth hunts and provides mentorship for the next generation. And yes, hunters rightly support all of this. The glass is at least half full here.

    Reply
    • Emily McKinley
      Emily McKinley says:

      Thanks, Michael. We appreciate your perspective and are glad you’ve been able to witness (and hopefully enjoy) Tennessee Wildlife Federation’s youth engagement programming.

      Reply
  2. Keith
    Keith says:

    I totally agree. I really dont use the boat ramps cause i havw my own but i paid for thee ramps and paid for the gun ranges but i have to pay sgain. The price is low but its the principle

    Reply
  3. lewis stern
    lewis stern says:

    I will agree With Eric Eustice, I came from Tx. 8 years ago and fortunately was able to buy a small farm on which to hunt, The ” FACT” that you own land in Tn. does no allow you to use this land for your own business, I,E , farming for wild life. The state does not allow land owners to raise deer on their own property for fear of CWD infestation , this is so much B,S, ! Deer farmers are among one of the nations most aware and informed persons in a new and growing industry in the U.S.. As I mentioned earlier I came from Tx.where if you wanted you had to lease property . The lack of private property that could be leased by the state and opened to the public for hunting is cause for the decline in hunting in our youth, The state should look into this as a source of hunting land for it’s hunting future. Now back to the Farming for Wild Life, The state has tied the hands of folks like me who wand to raise White tail deer to increase better deer for the local population. TN. says this practice will increase cases of CWD this is “bogus” , information . Where is the dockumation to back this up, A few people in the TWRA want to tell land owners what they can do . This is WRONG !!

    Reply
    • Emily McKinley
      Emily McKinley says:

      Yes, the East Tennessee deer herds were hit hard last year by epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD), which is spread by the biting midge, not deer-to-deer contact. The physical symptoms of EHD do mimic those of CWD, but they are not related. Please do stay vigilant however. The best way to safeguard our deer herds is to prevent its spread to Tennessee.

      If you’d like to learn more about CWD, we’d recommend checking out this page: https://tnwf.org/cwd/

      Reply
  4. Eric Eustice
    Eric Eustice says:

    We as hunters are asked to give to these causes which by the way I’m concerned about as much as anybody.But what about how we the hunters of tn are paying for everything and getting nothing in return as far as hunting license being way covered priced and no public land to hunt on as far as I’m concerned Tera has dropped the ball miserably when it comes to the hunters when is her gonna wake up and realize there not making anymore land the time to act is now!!!!!I live in Hamilton county where we have little public hunting land but not only a half a mile from where I live is the Cumberland trail with miles and miles of hiking trails ,campgrounds and facilities that we the hunters have paid for and yet were getting nothing in return.When we quit hunting y’all r not going to have jobs u say were losing hunters in tn there’s a reason for that no where to hunt and too high prices on hunting license I paid over 600 dollars just to hunt in tn this year it’s not worth it some pays more than that!Alabama and ga both have cheaper license and more public hunting land and better hunting WAKE up twra!!!

    Reply
    • Emily McKinley
      Emily McKinley says:

      Thanks for your reply, Eric.
      Tennessee Wildlife Federation is an independent nonprofit conservation organization serving all of Tennessee. We work hard to advocate for sound conservation policy that benefits all of our wildlife and natural resources. For example, we are currently advocating for the passage of Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, which would allocate already existing funds from oil and mineral revenues to address conservation needs of non-game wildlife, which in turn significantly reduces the burden on hunters who largely fund wildlife management coffers in Tennessee.
      Also, we advocate for keeping public lands public and accessible for all uses.

      Our friends at TWRA are responsible for the management of wildlife in the state as well as setting and enforcing related licensing and regulation.

      Reply

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