Issues

Back in 1946, the Tennessee Conservation League was formed to combat the growing impact of politics on wildlife and habitat. That organization became the Tennessee Wildlife Federation, and we’d like to think our founding fathers would be proud of the way we’ve fought to preserve our natural resources on behalf of Tennesseans who love to hunt, fish, paddle, hike, watch wildlife, and enjoy our Great Outdoors.

Following are highlights of important issues we’ve tackled over the last decade. You can also click here to learn more about our history.


  • TWF Joins Tennessee Nutrition Caucus as Inaugural Member

    by
    Tennessee Wildlife Federation
    | Apr 09, 2014
    The state’s Senate Majority Leader, Mark Norris (R-Collierville), launched the Tennessee Nutrition Caucus earlier this month, bringing legislators and multiple organizations together to address the ever-growing issue of hunger relief. The Tennessee Wildlife Federation (TWF) was invited to participate alongside other groups engaged in the fight against hunger and malnutrition,

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  • Water Resources Development Act passes U.S. House

    by
    Office of Sen. Lamar Alexander
    | Oct 25, 2013
    U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) today released the following statement on passage by the U.S. House of Representatives of the Water Resources Development Act, which included a plan similar to his to replace Chickamauga Lock, as well as Alexander’s permanent ban stopping the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from placing physical barriers below dams on the Cumberland River…

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  • ELK RESTORATION IN TENNESSEE (From 2003)

    by
    Tennessee Wildlife Federation
    | Sep 26, 2013
    Since the Tennessee Wildlife Federation teamed with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency to release the first elk in December of 2000, a total of 167 elk have been relocated to Tennessee from Elk Island National Park in Canada and LBL in Kentucky.

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  • A Conservation Success Story: Tennessee Establishes a Hunting Season for Sandhill Cranes

    by
    Tennessee Wildlife Federation
    | Sep 26, 2013
    According to the biologists at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Eastern Population of sandhill cranes have grown to huntable numbers. Just 20 years ago, sandhills were severely threatened. This is another tremendous success story for wildlife in America.

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  • Resisting Federal Overreach: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Proposed Ban on Tailwater Fishing

    by
    Tennessee Wildlife Federation
    | Sep 26, 2013

    More than a million Tennesseans enjoy fishing each year, with tens of thousands more traveling from around the nation to visit world-class tailwater fisheries below dams on a number of Cumberland River reservoirs.Those incredible public resources–and the billions in associated economic impact—were slated to be eliminated in early 2013 through a unilateral directive from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Commander Lt. Col. Jim DeLapp. Affected fisheries included Old Hickory, Cheatham, J. Percy Priest, Cordell Hull, Center Hill, and Dale Hollow, where a physical barrier would have been installed to keep boats from within several hundred yards of the dams.

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  • Wild Hogs in Tennessee: Controlling an Epidemic

    by
    Tennessee Wildlife Federation
    | Sep 26, 2013
    In 2011, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency took aggressive measures to address a rapidly spreading epidemic: invasive, non-native wild pigs were taking over the landscape. The Agency delisted the hogs as a big game species and began working with landowners to kill the pigs by virtually any means necessary…

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  • Reauthorization of the TWRA/Fish and Wildlife Commission

    by
    Tennessee Wildlife Federation
    | Sep 26, 2013
    Starting with the 2010 legislative session, a small group of state House members undertook an effort to shut down the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) by placing the Agency in “wind-down” mode, which would prepare TWRA and its critical wildlife and fisheries management work for elimination.

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  • Deer Farming: Fighting Against the Privatization of our Wildlife

    by
    Tennessee Wildlife Federation
    | Sep 26, 2013

    One of the most dangerous pieces of legislation in modern history was first introduced in the Tennessee General Assembly’s 2011 session. “The White-tailed Deer Breeding and Farming Act” would have legalized the breeding, purchase and sale of white-tailed deer as livestock for the purpose of penned hunting.TWF was proud to lead a coalition that included numerous conservation organizations, as well as veterinarians, wildlife biologists, communicable disease specialists, hunters, and wildlife lovers. We viewed it as an unnecessary and potentially irresponsible risk to our state’s priceless natural resources.

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  • The Right to Hunt and Fish: An Amendment to the Tennessee Constitution

    by
    Tennessee Wildlife Federation
    | Sep 26, 2013
    All the way back to Ancient Rome, democratic societies have recognized the individual right to hunt and fish. But during the Norman Conquest in England, a landowner could be put to death for hunting or fishing on his own property. On Bastille Day, the French go fishing to celebrate their independence – the inability to do so was a central issue that led to the revolution in 1789.

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The Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission recently passed a limited sandhill crane season.

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Sen. Lamar Alexander, with support from TWF CEO Mike Butler, left, spoke at a spring 2013 press conference related to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plan to restrict tailwaters fishing in Tennessee.  The USACE legislation was rejected.

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TWF is part of a Memorandum of Understanding initiated by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency that is taking aggressive measures to stop the epidemic of feral hog population growth across Tennessee.

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Legislation to support deer farming has recently reared its ugly head in Tennessee.