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Hunting Season means Youth Hunting & Fishing Program Season

Deer Hunt at Dr. Jack Gayden and Dr. David Sloas farms, December 2016

Hunting season is upon us which means Tennessee Wildlife Federation’s Youth Hunting & Fishing Program is in full swing! This year showcases exciting program expansion to get more kids outdoors in more ways.

One of our key youth engagement programs, the Youth Hunting & Fishing Program, boasts over 30 hunting and fishing events in the next few months.

Youth engaged in our Tennessee Scholastic Clay Target Program, and who have completed their hunter’s education requirements, are invited to take part in the Youth Hunting & Fishing Program activities.

Many of the 30+ events are part of our Hunt Master initiative that provides full-immersion, three-day experiences designed to introduce youth to all aspects of hunting—from camping, to tracking, to field-to-table cooking. These events get parents involved in the experience and foster stewardship. This year’s events include dove, deer, duck, and turkey hunts!

For the first time ever, the Federation is adding an archery hunt to our list of activities. This year, five of our youth participants completed bow hunting education courses, and they are joining us as we also host youth from our Texas affiliate. The hunt will take place at Land Between the Lakes in northwest Tennessee, making it our first public lands hunt!

READ MORE: Why the West’s Public Lands Battle is Important to Tennessee

We’re also thrilled to announce three Hunt Master training classes, which will increase the number of hunts we have next year. Through the training, the Federation expects to add as many as 45 Hunt Masters to our volunteer ranks! These sportsmen and women will lead dozens of youth every year into the great outdoors.

This season also marks the 10th annual Davis P. Rice Memorial Youth Waterfowl Hunt. A classic among our youth, partners, and staff, the Federation looks forward to celebrating this anniversary with another great turnout.

These programs are possible only because of the generosity of landowners who provide access for our youth hunters and anglers.

“When we started these programs, we thought the biggest obstacle we would face is finding landowners who would allow us access. When you show them photos of past events and talk about taking kids out hunting, they want to engage,” said J.W. Worthen, director of programs.

The Federation is growing traditions, creating new conservationists, and spreading our love for the great outdoors. Join us on a hunt, register for Hunt Master training, or consider partnering with Tennessee Wildlife Federation.

Learn more on our website and contact us at info@tnwf.org to get started.

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